It is believed that these six men were brothers who were part of the Amborn family that settled in southern Wisconsin between 1847 and 1852.

Name Born Birth Place Died Where
Heinrich [Henry] Adam Amborn 1800 Germany 21 Jan 1869 Wisconsin, USA
Sebastian Amborn 1802 Germany 11 Dec 1876 Wisconsin, USA
Gottreich [George] Heinrich Amborn 7 Nov 1805 Germany 12 Jul 1875 Wisconsin, USA
Daniel Friedlieb Amborn 1811 Germany 26 Oct 1892 Wisconsin, USA
Casper Frederick Amborn 24 Sep 1816 Germany 28 Aug 1875 Wisconsin, USA
Johan Anton Amborn 1820 Germany 12 May 1883 Wisconsin, USA

This family has been traced to Niederschmalkalden, Sachsen-Meiningen, in the modern-day state of Thüringen, Germany thanks to the efforts of members of the Cooper County, Missouri Historical Society. They have transcribed newspaper and passport information from the period and have created a database of Immigrants from Sachsen-Meiningen, Germany (among other areas). This database (viewable on the societies website) refers to several members of the Amborn family and identifies the month & year that they departed Germany for the United States:

Last Name First Name Month  Year Living Place Profession Notice
Amborn W. Apr 1846 Unterkatz Taylor
Amborn Casper Fredrich Mar 1847 Niederschmalkalden
Amborn [George] Heinrich Mar 1847 Niederschmalkalden
Amborn Daniel Friedlieb Mar 1848 Niederschmalkalden
Amborn Heinrich Adam Mar 1848 Niederschmalkalden Mechanic
Amborn Sebastian Apr 1852 Niederschmalkalden with wife and 2 children
Amborn [Johann] Anton Apr 1853 Niederschmalkalden with wife and 2 children
Amborn Christine Apr 1853 Niederschmalkalden
Amborn Daniel Apr 1853 Niederschmalkalden

Niederschmalkalden, Meiningen, Sachsen-Meiningen, Germany is cataloged in the Meyers Gazetteer: View Information

They probably were Protestant in Germany and Lutheran in Wisconsin (although George D Amborn, grandson of Casper Frederick Amborn, reportedly converted to Catholicism prior to his marriage to Anna Marie Schultz in 1905).

David Kimball (b. 1801) reportedly emigrated from Wernshausn Sachsen Meininson Saxony Germany with his wife Margaret E Young (b 1809) and family (5 daughters and 4 sons ranging in age from 2 to 19 years old) and settled in the same town in Wisconsin, also in 1847. It is possible that these families traveled together.

The timeline below documents the emigration of the Amborn family:

1847 – March: Casper Frederick Amborn (b. 24 September 1816) and his brother Gottreich Heinrich Amborn (b. 1805) leave Niederschmalkalden, Germany.

“The parents [Caspar and Louise Amborn] and their two sons [Antone Henry Amborn, b. 25 December 1840 and Gottreich Henry Amborn, b. 19 March 1842] and two daughters [Irene Amborn, b. 1845 is the only daughter known to have been born in Germany] came to America in 1847, direct to Wisconsin, the voyage across the ocean requiring seven weeks. They landed in Kenosha and the next day started for Walworth county, two days later finding them in Lyons township, and here they at once bought forty acres of land [1 January 1851], and this was the family home until 1869, when the father and mother sold out and moved to Burr Oak, La Crosse county, and there the father and mother spent their last days.”

History of Walworth County, Wisconsin (1912), pages 954-55. By Albert Clayton Beckwith (1836-1915)

Note: George Heinrich Amborn married Anna Elisabeth Schliecher (b. 24 December 1823) in Germany in 1845, and their first child was born in Bloomfield, Walworth, Wisconsin on 21 March 1848. She almost certainly accompanied him when he sailed over in 1847.

1847 – May: Casper Frederick Amborn arrives in New York.

1847 – July 6: Casper Frederick Amborn files his declaration of intent to become a United States citizen in Walworth County, Wisconsin.

1848 – March: Daniel Friedlieb Amborn and Heinrich Adam Amborn depart Niederschmalkalden, Germany

1848 – June 12: Henry [Heinrich] Adam Amborn (b. 1800), Daniel Friedlieb Amborn (b. 1810) and Christine Amborn (Male, b. 1826) arrive in New York on the Belinda

Year: 1848; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237, 1820-1897; Microfilm Roll: Roll 073; Line: 18; List Number: 545; Page Number: 4

1848 – July 12: Henry [Heinrich] Adam Amborn (b. 1800) files his declaration of intent to become a United States citizen in Walworth County, Wisconsin.

1848 – September 1: Johan [Gottreich] Heinrich Amborn (b. 7 Nov 1805) and Casper Berthelmeh purchase the SouthWest quarter of the SouthWest quarter of Section 9, Township 1 North of Range 18 East in the district of lands subject to sale at Milwaukee, Wisconsin containing Forty Acres.

View a contemporary Google Map of this location.

1851 – January 1: Casper Frederick Amborn purchases the South East quarter of the South East Quarter of Section 26 in Township two of Range Eighteen in the District of Lands subject to sale at Milwaukee Wisconsin containing 40 acres.

View a contemporary Google Map of this location.

1852 – April: Sebastian Amborn (b. 1802) departs Niederschmalkalden, Germany with his wife and 2 children.

1852 – May 28: Sebastian Amborn (b. 1802) arrives in New York from Bremon, Germany on the Childe Harold with wife Elizabeth and daughters Marie and Elise.

Year: 1852; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237, 1820-1897; Microfilm Roll: Roll 113; Line: 56; List Number: 615

1852 – June: Sebastian Amborn (b. 1782) arrives in New York. He would have been about 70 years old at the time.

1853 – April: Christin Amborn and Daniel Amborn depart Niederschmalkalden, Germany.

1853 – April: Johann Anton Amborn departs Niederschmalkalden, Germany with his wife and 2 children.

1853 – Johann Anton Amborn (b. 1820) arrives New York. [The 1900 census record for August Amborn states that  his wife Dorothea Weyrauth, son August and daughter Fredricka arrived in the United States in 1852.]

1900 United States Census, August Amborn Household. n.p: Bloomfield Township, Walworth County, Wisconsin. Supervisors District 5, Enumeration District 83, Sheet 11, Lines 70 – 72

1853 – November 7:  Sebastian Amborn (b. 1782) files his declaration of intent to become a United States citizen in Walworth County, Wisconsin. He was 71 years old at the time. [It is my belief that this Sebastian may be the father of the Amborn’s discussed in the write-up, but I have no proof. This document is the only reference I have found to his existence.]

1855 – May 1: Sebastian Amborn (b. 1802) purchases the North West quarter of the South East Quarter of Section 9 in Township one North of Range Eighteen East in the District of Lands subject to sale at Milwaukee Wisconsin containing 40 acres.

View the center of this plot on Google Maps.

1872 – Casper Frederick Amborn served as a Supervisor for the Town of Lyons

History of Walworth County, Chicago Western Historical Society, Published 1882, Page 809

1873 – Chicago, Illinois: Everts, Baskin and Stewart published Combination atlas map of Walworth County Wisconsin” that included maps identifying land ownership for each township.

The map for Bloomfield Township (Town number 1 North in Range number 18 East) identified several Amborns and the land they owned:

  • S 1/2 SW 1/4, Section 2 – A. [Anton] Amborn (80 Acres)
  • SE 1/4 SE 1/4 Section 3 – A. [Anton] Amborn (40 Acres, adjacent to the land described above)
  • W 1/2 SE 1/4 Section 12 – A. [Anton] Amborn (80 Acres)
  • NE 1/4 NE 1/4  Section 13 – A. [Anton] Amborn (40 Acres, adjacent to the land described above)
  • NW 1/4 SE 1/4 Section 3 – D. [Daniel] Amborn

The map for Lyons Township (Town number 2 North in Range number 18 East) also identified several Amborns and the land they owned:

  • SE 1/4 SE 1/4  Section 26 – C.F. Amborn (40 Acres)
  • E 1/2 SW 1/4 NE 1/4 Section 35 – C.F. Amborn (20 Acres)
  • NE 1/4 NW 1/4 Section 36 – C.F. Amborn (40 Acres)

This same publication listed  “Amburn, C.F. [Casper F Amborn], Lyons Township, Section 35, Date of Settlement: 1846, native of Germany, Occupation: Farmer” on the Patrons Business Directory of Walworth County page (page 67)

1879 – November 25: George [Gottreich] Henry Amborn (born 7 Nov 1805) receives land grant for the North East quarter of the South West quarter of Section 7 in Township 18 of range 6 West in the district of lands subject to sale at La Crosse Wisconsin containing 40 acres.

View the center of this plot on Google Maps.

1882 – May: John Henry Amborn (b. 13 August 1856), son of Henry Adam Amborn, arrives in New York.

1884 – August 28: John Henry Amborn (b. 1856), son of Henry Adam Amborn, files his declaration of intent to become a United States citizen in Walworth County, Wisconsin.

1886 – March 27: Daniel F Amborn becomes a US citizen in Walworth County, Wisconsin. One of his witnesses is Casper F Amborn, who is by then already a US citizen.

1900 – Antone Henry Amborn’s US Census entry indicates that he entered the United States in 1847

1900 – Gottreich Henry Amborn’s US Census entry indicates that he entered the United States in 1847

1912 – September 17: John Henry Amborn (b. 13 August 1856), son of Henry Adam Amborn, becomes a naturalized citizen of the United States.

1920 – Antone Henry Amborn’s US Census entry indicates that he entered the United States in 1847.

Research Questions

  • Are there any records in Germany to prove that they lived in/near Niederschmalkalden?
  • Were Heinrich, Sebastian, Gottreich, Daniel, Casper and Johan brothers?
  • Who were their parents?
  • Were there any other siblings
  • What genealogical records exist in Germany and where are they located?
  • Who was Sebastian Amborn (b. 1782) and where is he buried?
  • Was the W Amborn who departed Niederschmalkalden in 1846 part of the same family? Where did he emigrate to?

Notes:

  • The Kirchenbuch, 1858-1929: Evangelisch Lutherische St. Johannis Gemeinde (Slades Corner, Wisconsin) Contains history, members, baptisms, communicants 1867-1924, confirmations 1867-1929, meeting reports 1867-1899, marriages, deaths 1863-1929, collections 1869-1897, and misc. newspaper clippings. This is on FamilySearch Film 1404984 Items 1-2. This may document some events related to the David Kimball family. A copy was ordered on 13 June 2017: it will be sent to the Dallas Public Library.
Amborn Family Migration
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